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04|13|2011 03:14 pm EDT

Domain Madness 3 Live Auction Results

by Frank Michlick in Categories: Domain Auction

After the first attempt at a live auction for Domain Madness 3 encountered technical difficulties last week, the auction is going to conclude live again today. DNN will be was live blogging the auction events without any guarantees on accuracy. Unsold domains will remain in auction on Boxcar until tomorrow 3pm EDT. There were no major technical difficulties aside from a small problem with the live stream.

The winner of the $1,000 from the auction pool will be announced on April 30th.

The auction sold 12 of the 64 names for a total of $161,605.

Sold domains in order of price were:

  1. Ocean.com, $100, 000
  2. Irons.com, $38,000
  3. Ocean.net, $5,000
  4. SmoothLegs.com, $3,500
  5. BroadbandProviders.com, $3,050
  6. BaseballTrainer.com, $2,500
  7. ImpoundAuction.com, $2,500
  8. Waikiki.me, $1,750
  9. GasDeals.com, $1,605
  10. EliminateDebts.com, $1,500
  11. OnlineTheft.com, $1,200
  12. Cradle.net, $1,000

The top 3 names, along with at least one additional name were all bought by the same buyer without contesting bids.

One name, FamilyVacation.com, was removed from the auction during the auction as per the request of the buyer and seller. The reserve for this name was listed at $38,000.

See the full live auction results after the jump.

DomainReserve PriceStatusSale Price
ArmTattoos.com$1,200pass
AthleticClubs.com$5,000pass
AutoRepairs.com$150,000pass
BaseballGame.com$20,000pass
BaseballTicket.com$10,000pass
BaseballTrainer.com$2,500SOLD$2,500
BasketballDrills.com$5,000pass
Bet.ws$2,000pass
BetterBody.com$4,500pass
BigWinner.com$5,000pass
BroadbandProviders.com$1,550SOLD$3,050
CashBackCredit.com$4,000pass
Champs.tv$1,000pass
CheckCard.net$1,000pass
ChildDevelopment.com$150,000pass
Cradle.net$1,000SOLD$1,000
Discount.us$2,200pass
DomainDevelopment.com$15,000pass
DoubleOven.com$6,500pass
DrugDeal.com$2,500pass
DrugDeals.com$10,000pass
EliminateDebts.com$1,500SOLD$1,500
Evenings.com$9,500pass
FamilyVacation.com$35,000sold outside auction / removed
FinancialPlanners.com$200,000pass
FlightSale.com$3,500pass
FlowerBouquets.com$40,000pass
ForexCurrency.com$17,500pass
FreezerBurn.com$3,500pass
GasDeals.com$1,000SOLD$1,605
GPSdevices.com$20,000pass
Gyrate.com$9,000pass
HomeOwnerInsurance.com$120,000pass
HoneyBellOranges.com$25,000pass
iLoveShopping.com$5,500pass
ImpoundAuction.com$2,500SOLD$2,500
Incentives.net$2,000pass
Irons.com$38,000SOLD$38,000
JobResume.com$7,500pass
LastMinDeals.com$4,000pass
LocalSupplier.com$1,000pass
MagicSpell.com$5,000pass
MensJewelry.com$45,000pass
MiracleCream.com$5,000pass
NameGames.com$2,500pass
OfficeScreens.com$1,000pass
OnlineTheft.com$1,000SOLD$1,200
Pig.com$250,000pass
RefinanceCalculator.com$30,000pass
RentHome.net$2,500pass
RibSauce.com$2,000pass
SingAlongs.com$2,500pass
SiteManagers.com$1,000pass
SmoothLegs.com$3,500SOLD$3,500
StationaryStore.com$5,000pass
StayCool.com$5,500removed
TanningStickers.com$2,500pass
Title.info$3,000pass
TractionTires.com$1,000pass
Uncoordinated.com$1,000pass
Waikiki.me$1,750SOLD$1,750
YellowstoneNationalPark.net$1,000pass
ZoomLens.com$8,500pass
LimoRentals.com$160,000pass
Ocean.com$100,000SOLD$100,000
Ocean.net$5,000SOLD$5,000

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21 Comments

Good Domain Names

April 14, 2011 @ 10:39 am EDT

Ocean.net was a really nice buy at this price.

dnnews

April 14, 2011 @ 4:12 pm EDT

@GDN: IIRC the buyer of Ocean.net and Ocean.com were one and the same person. He also bought Irons.com.

Josh

April 14, 2011 @ 9:18 pm EDT

wow…ocean…wow…wow totally unjustifiable.

Anthony David

April 15, 2011 @ 6:38 pm EDT

How is ocean.com unjustifiable? Someone could build a million dollar business on that domain.

Josh

April 15, 2011 @ 8:04 pm EDT

Your justification is COULD.

My justification from a domainer/reseller stand point is based on more then wishes and fishes.

Either it was an end user…

Wealthly domainer who over pays for what he wants…

A moron who will learn a hard lesson…

You cannot resale that name in our industry, it would have to be end user, who is the targeted end user who is missing traffic, the little it has?

I work with models that do not rely simply on COULD, my goal is to make money, no maybe’s.

dnnews

April 15, 2011 @ 8:14 pm EDT

Re: ocean.com: If the username of the the buyer reflected who bought the name, it was a well known domainer who has been in this industry many years.

Josh

April 15, 2011 @ 8:19 pm EDT

So falls under the wealthy/over pay for what you want crowd.

Im sorry Frank but just because someone CAN doesnt mean they should, it is not how they got to where they are today.

Frank Michlick

April 15, 2011 @ 8:25 pm EDT

@Josh: I’m not judging the purchase itself ;-) Maybe they had a buyer in mind or maybe they had the extra cash lying around. I IM’ed the buyer and asked them to drop by.

Josh

April 15, 2011 @ 8:30 pm EDT

Should be interesting and likely what would be considered an end user purchase.

Adam Strong

April 15, 2011 @ 9:59 pm EDT

I’m pretty sure I know the buyer, as do you Josh and we both know he’s no dummy that just has money to blow on stupid decisions. He wouldn’t have money like that if he was stupid. He’ll hold it and flip it up for more. I’ve seen him do it before. Ocean has that potential to be applied to anything and there’ll be an end-user one day. Long term play.

Josh

April 15, 2011 @ 10:05 pm EDT

I suspect I now too, my moron comment refered to smaller players who do not have the luxury to over pay for something just because they can. You see Adam, I can take $100k and with some work turn a profit of 6 figures, year after year… just different strats is all, for me its dead money on wishes and fishes, especially at that level, there is no escape, its not $100k liquid.

If the theory is its a name which could apply to anything and eventually some end user somewhere will brand themself Ocean, couldnt that apply to thousands of generics?

Adam

April 15, 2011 @ 11:21 pm EDT

To each their own dude. Some people have more money than investments to put that money in and like the chase ;)

Frank Michlick

April 16, 2011 @ 2:26 am EDT

The buyer is Richard from iWhois. He gave me permission to mention his name.

Anthony David

April 16, 2011 @ 2:49 am EDT

Josh, I don’t think you understand why its worth that much or more. Ocean.com is worth 100K and a good buy at that price.

Its highly memorable and its also a one-worder, its not like branding on some silly madeup word or a stupid domain hack which I see too much of today.

So what if it has to be sold to an end user? (which is not necessarily true, by the way) There are development teams and angel investors out there looking to build $xxx,xxx,xxx projects on premium domains. Look no further than path.com that Google tried to buy for 100 million, but were rejected. 100K-500K is not a lot for these groups to spend on a domain.

I think ocean.com could work for a social network brand. Successful social networks are worth from ten of millions to billions.

Successful websites are very profitable businesses. Building them on good domains increases the chance of success manyfold.

Even if a big project were built on domain and the site didnt pan out, that was no doubt because of the development and marketing, not the domain name. The domain will still have its inherent value and the buyers could sell it back into the market and get their money back on it. That doesn’t sound like a bad investment to me.

Josh

April 16, 2011 @ 7:30 am EDT

Richard is a swell guy, Im sure and have heard. However this is still an end user price imo, there is no way this name see’s anything close to even $50k anywhere in this market.

I have a VERY strong grasp of value, there is nothing to justify that price at our RESELLER level, not the term, traffic, commercial use… we are not talking about a term which implies anything in regads to commerce, no one needs to buy ” ocean “.

It was an end user price, that was my point, it was not a resale buy imo. If that was the point (development) fine, congrats they got their brand name. Otherwise, good luck to him as a reseller.

If you can justify that price being a good buy in terms of an investment for a reseller, there is about XXXX names you should go buy for $100k each right away.

I think Richard must have a plan for the name, which is fine, makes him an end user in this particular situation.

Adam Strong

April 16, 2011 @ 1:15 pm EDT

So are you saying richard doesn’t have a grasp of values ?

“we are not talking about a term which implies anything in regads to commerce, no one needs to buy ” ocean “.”

no one needs to buy color or disco or action or shield or mind or . . . . this is a different sort of domain. One that is a bigger risk for sure but again, there’s people who can take those risks and those that can’t.

“there is about XXXX names you should go buy for $100k each right away.”

send me that list soon please. Keep me in mind for all those deals you pass up.

Josh

April 16, 2011 @ 2:24 pm EDT

Adam, don’t play with my words, I am sure Richard has a very good grasp of reseller values. Which is why I found it shocking that at $100k it would be bought to resale. If he purchased it as an end usr and has plans, great.

Also your disco/color comparable is bunk, those are end user buys, not reseller. Also investing $100k on wishes and fishes is not my model, why not go to sedo and offer $100k on some of those top one word names listed I am sure someone will take it and youll make $XXXk on a flip easily, right? lol

My stance is simply it was too much to buy and resale, period.

Adam Strong

April 16, 2011 @ 10:12 pm EDT

Maybe I’m just blind and missing all the deals. . . . but there’s not much even close that I can spot on sedo.

Still happy to pay you some finders fees Josh.

From Sedo’s “Top Domains List”

bracelets.com 2,000,000 USD 1 Continue

racquetball.com 1,500,000 USD 2 Continue

trailers.com 1,400,000 USD 1 Continue

brakes.com 1,300,000 USD – Continue

number.com 750,000 USD 1 Continue

compass.com 700,000 USD 7 Continue

jewel.com 500,000 USD 3 Continue

mp3download.com 400,000 USD 2 Continue

elk.com 400,000 USD 2 Continue

cheapgas.com 350,000 USD – Continue

defy.com 350,000 USD 1 Continue

rhodes.com 350,000 USD 51 Continue

ferienhaus.de 350,000 EUR – Continue

webhosting.de 300,000 EUR 17 Continue

knockouts.com 275,000 USD – Continue

uhr.de 250,000 EUR 28 Continue

real.es 200,000 EUR 14 Continue

lohnsteuer.de 189,704 EUR 11 Continue

frage.de 185,760 EUR 26 Continue

gay.org 175,000 USD – Continue

uwant.com 150,000 USD 9 Continue

consent.com 150,000 USD – Continue

france.org 150,000 USD – Continue

bücher.com 149,000 EUR 9 Continue

akt.de 140,000 EUR 75 Continue

prosecco.de 113,822 EUR 4 Continue

wirelessprinters.com 100,000 USD – Continue

wirelessrouters.com 100,000 USD – Continue

mocast.com 90,000 USD – Continue

mocasts.com 90,000 USD – Continue

divorcio.com 85,000 USD 16 Continue

hochzeitstag.de 75,882 EUR 9 Continue

filth.com 50,000 EUR 5 Continue

diamondnecklaces.co.uk 50,000 GBP – Continue

korea.co 50,000 USD – Continue

Josh

April 17, 2011 @ 6:51 pm EDT

You know why you are asking still Adam, because you know I know of some heehee

Personally over the last 5 years I have sold numerous big 5 and 6 figure one word dot com’s. If one has patience and the time, they can be found. I suppose suppose some of the larger or busy players don;t have the time and find these auctions as a good market to buy, for me I have time, too much time lol

Richard

April 18, 2011 @ 1:36 pm EDT

Hey guys,

Lively discussion! Josh, I too have owned many one word generics. And have sold numerous ones at, or around, the $100k mark to other domainers who aren’t building out. I’ve seen them go on to flip them for more (hats off to them) and also buy to just hold on to them. But my biggest flips (to end users) have been on domains that have a cost base higher than what Ocean.com went for.

Sometimes it is necessary to pay more for a domain than today’s market, in order to have it in your portfolio for when the market catches up and passes what you paid. Like overpaying for a corner lot – I’ve done that on domains like Vancouver.net – but I don’t believe I’ve done that on Ocean.com

Research the number and types of companies that call themselves something containing Ocean and you can see the value – it may take five or even ten years for one of those companies to realize that they should hold the name. But when they do, the corner lot is available for purchase, and the $100k paid will seem like a steal.

Ocean is much more powerful a name than any in the Sedo list that Adam posted. I see the value of Ocean in the same realm as what I would see Pure.com, Blue.com, Clear.com or similar domains to be worth. These are $1m domains imh-(and experienced and informed)-o.

I’d like to share a story with you but it’s covered by an nda. Suffice it to say that a domainer bought a domain for around $100k, flipped it to me for a handsome profit, and I (not being an end user) have sold it on to an end user for my own profit.

Buying at $100k isn’t always end-user pricing. Many people think it should be, and yes, it would be easy to make an expensive mistake buying up all 1 word generics at that range. But some domains stand out from others.

Ocean conjures up different meanings and thoughts for different people. To me I see:

– powerful

– large

– brave

– exploratory

– beautiful

– calm

Ocean brings up good memories for me. So, I also bought Ocean.net to never resell – I never met an Ocean I didn’t love so I just had to have it. The .com is for sale, even if it takes a decade for it to reach the ideal end-user.

Josh

April 18, 2011 @ 5:19 pm EDT

Thank you for chiming in Richard, I know you are a smart guy and had a ” plan” in mind. I also appreciate you explaining it is a future investment.

Great insight and thinking as to why you purchased the name. I only wish you all the best of course.

Perhaps my vision is much shorter sighted, after all it is how I made it to where I am today in this business. My forecast of furture domain values changes from time to time, I am very conservative and rather pessimistic not just in this industry but most all.

I suppose the term ” the bigger the risk the bigger the reward ” comes to mind!

Again, all the best!

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