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06|16|2007 12:02 am EDT

Petition against Domain Parking?

by Frank Michlick in Categories: Editorial, ICANN / Policy

YouChoose.net (a site that says it’s in Beta), is holding a petition to ask ICANN president and CEO Paul Twomey to stop domain tasting. The petition, which was started by Internet Seer, reads:

We, the undersigned, are concerned about domain name parking abuse and request that ICANN revisit the Anti-Cyberssquatting Consumer Protection Act and the Trademark Cyberpiracy Prevention Act to ensure that a domain names that are parked would be available for sale at a price tag that would not be considered extortion. We request that ‘Cybersquatting’ issues be discussed, reviewed and formalized this year into a written law to help stop the continuation of domain parking as an extortionist means that cause legitimate businesses to pay high price for the domain name.

So domain tasting is the same as cybersquatting? Something’s wrong here. Domain tasting refers to the process that allows registrars to register a name, and delete it again within five days (=grace period) if there’s no traffic on the name. Cybersquatting means a domain name registration that is infringing on the legal rights of others.

But also if domain tasting, domain parking and cybersquatting is all one and the same, how come that “legimate” businesses want those “illegal” names?

Petition against Domain Parking?There a little flaw with the voting system on the site – maybe that’s why YouChoose.net is still in Beta. If you locate the very small “No, I oppose” link (it’s right underneath the huge “Sign the petition” button), and pass the Java Script pop up notification (“Are you sure?”) receive an error message. A nice application that errors out when you oppose something – reminds me a bit of electronic voting machines.

Domain Tasting Petition Error

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3 Comments

Michele Neylon

June 18, 2007 @ 6:59 pm EDT

Frank

It’s kind of ironic that a company that has been accused of spamming in the past should be the one to start a petition of this kind.

Michele

Leonard Holmes

June 20, 2007 @ 12:44 am EDT

What’s even worse, this petition is not opposing domain tasting – it is opposing domain PARKING.

Jothan Frakes

June 20, 2007 @ 8:42 pm EDT

Here’s the craziest thing about this petition … It’s worded very similar to the wording of an internet brand management consultant for a major telecommunications provider.

I won’t name names, but its concealed purpose preys on the unknowing and potentially passionate disenfranchised for signing and the only real thing to come from it is that the graph or count of signatories will end up being presented in some intellectual property report or industry breifing.

This petition is an entirely obtuse concept on behalf of the petitioner and extremely illustrative of how education on the way the internet works for both the author and petition signers might benefit things far more for their user experiences.

There are so many folks out there that think domain parking is an evil blight, but if it were eliminated through policy from ICANN (which wouldn’t really happen, only because it is quite likely out of scope) the only thing accomplished would be to push all that advertising revenue to the search engines or browser developers and the user experience would remain the same.

Congratulations on the circular efforts chasing one’s tail to whomever set it up. Online advertising is happening on the internet and domain parking is part of that. A petition might be a feel good sugar medicine that lets folks have that moment of gratification, but honestly, online advertising is not going away, for better or worse.

One cannot unfart.

All that has really happened is they have given that website an opportunity to collect more usernames and email addresses and other demographic information so that they can get spammed.

Maybe they are more clever than given credit, but it seems like the petition is clearly directs people to the “yes” option.

-Jothan

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